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Pandemic severity index

The pandemic severity index is a proposed classification scale for reporting the severity of influenza pandemics in the United States. The PSI was accompanied by a set of guidelines intended to help communicate appropriate actions for communities ...

Participatory poverty assessment

Participatory poverty assessment is the approach to analyzing and reducing poverty by incorporating the views of the poor. PPAs attempt to better understand the poor, to give the poor more influence over decisions that affect their lives, and to ...

Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health

The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health is a multi-constituency partnership hosted by the World Health Organization and chaired by Graça Machel. PMNCH seeks to achieve universal access to comprehensive, high-quality reproductive, mat ...

Pathogens and Global Health

Pathogens and Global Health is a peer-reviewed medical journal published by Maney Publishing. It covers tropical diseases, including their microbiology, epidemiology and molecular biology, as well as medical entomology, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tub ...

Cristina Possas

Cristina Possas de Albuquerque is a Brazilian public health scientist working with infectious diseases and emerging infectious diseases from an eco-social perspective. However, her approach to social ecosystem complexity is quite different from t ...

President's Malaria Initiative

The Presidents Malaria Initiative is a U.S. Government initiative to control and eliminate malaria, one of the leading global causes of premature death and disability. The initiative was originally launched by U.S. president George W. Bush in 200 ...

Prince Mahidol Award

The Prince Mahidol Award is a Thai Royal Family annual award for outstanding achievements in medicine and public health worldwide.

Priority-setting in global health

In global health, priority-setting is a term used for the process and strategy of deciding which health interventions to carry out. Priority-setting can be conducted at the disease level, the overall strategy level, research level, or other levels.

Project Gaia

Project Gaia is a U.S. non-governmental, non-profit organization involved in the creation of a commercially viable household market for alcohol-based fuels in Ethiopia and other countries in the developing world. The project considers alcohol fue ...

Public Health Emergency of International Concern

A Public Health Emergency of International Concern is a formal declaration by the World Health Organization of "an extraordinary event which is determined to constitute a public health risk to other States through the international spread of dise ...

Pulse vaccination strategy

The pulse vaccination strategy is a method used to eradicate an epidemic by repeatedly vaccinating a group at risk, over a defined age range, until the spread of the pathogen has been stopped. It is most commonly used during measles and polio epi ...

Rise Against Hunger

Rise Against Hunger is an international hunger relief non-profit organization that coordinates the packaging and distribution of food and other aid to people in developing nations. Founded in 1998, Rise Against Hunger mobilizes more than 400.000 ...

Social effects of H5N1

See Influenza pandemic for government preparation for an H5N1 pandemic The social impact of H5N1 is the effect or influence of H5N1 in human society; especially the financial, political, social, and personal responses to both actual and predicted ...

Spanish flu

The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic. Lasting from January 1918 through December 1920, it infected 500 million people - about a quarter of the worlds population. The death toll is estima ...

Super-spreader

A super-spreader is an unusually contagious organism infected with a disease. In context of a human-borne illness, a super-spreader is an individual who is more likely to infect others, compared with a typical infected person. Such super-spreader ...

Targeting (international health)

Targeting is a commonly used technique in the areas of international health and public health which focuses on the development of specialized health intervention approaches for a specific group of people. These groups of people may be identified ...

The Task Force for Global Health

The Task Force for Global Health is an international, nonprofit organization that works to improve health of people most in need, primarily in developing countries. Founded in 1984 by global health pioneer Dr. William Foege, The Task Force consis ...

The State of the World's Children

The State of the Worlds Children is an annual report published by the United Nations Childrens Fund. It is the flagship publication of the organization. The first report was published in 1980, having been introduced by James P. Grant. Peter Adams ...

Timeline of global health

UNs Millennium Development Goals establishes health care as an important goal not just combating infectious diseases. Later in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals build on the MDGs to outline the objectives that will transform our world by en ...

To Save Humanity

To Save Humanity is a 2015 anthology of 96 essays on global health by authors who range from heads of states, movie stars, scientists at leading universities, activists, and Nobel Prize winners. Each contributor was asked the same question: "What ...

Tropical disease

Tropical diseases are diseases that are prevalent in or unique to tropical and subtropical regions. The diseases are less prevalent in temperate climates, due in part to the occurrence of a cold season, which controls the insect population by for ...

David Vanderpool

David Vanderpool is an American medical missionary and the CEO and founder of Live Beyond, which has provided medical, spiritual and logistical support to disaster ridden countries. Vanderpools work is unusual in that he combines his medical trai ...

Voices of the Poor

Voices of the Poor was an effort in the 1990s through 2000 by the World Bank to collect the experiences of the poor across the world. The name is also used for the reports that were eventually published from the effort. The effort consisted of tw ...

WHO collaborating centres in occupational health

The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries. The effort ...

WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean

The WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean is the regional office of the World Health Organization that serves 22 countries and territories in the Middle East, the North Africa, the Horn of Africa and Central Asia. It is one of the WHO ...

WHO-CHOICE

WHO-CHOICE is an initiative started by the World Health Organization in 1998 to help countries choose their healthcare priorities. It is an example of priority-setting in global health. It was one of the earliest projects to perform sectoral cost ...

World Health Academy

The World Health Academy is an international non-governmental organization specializing in global health. It serves as a representative body for physicians worldwide, developing health policy, advancing continuing education programs, and speaking ...

World Health Imaging, Telemedicine, and Informatics Alliance

The World Health Imaging, Telemedicine and Informatics Alliance is a non-profit global health technology and social venture established in 2006 by affiliates of Northwestern University near Chicago, Illinois. WHITIA cultivates high-level strategi ...

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization is a specialised agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. It is part of the U.N. Sustainable Development Group. The WHO Constitution, which establishes the agencys governing structure ...

World Health Organization collaborating centre

A World Health Organization collaborating centre is one of "over 700 institutions in 80 countries" that works with the World Health Organization in disciplines such as occupational health, food safety, and communicable disease prevention. Collabo ...

World Health Report

The World Health Report is a series of annual reports produced by the World Health Organization. First published in 1995, the World Health Report is WHOs leading publication. The reports were published every year from 1995 to 2008, and again in 2 ...

World Hearing Day

World Hearing Day is a campaign held each year by Office of Prevention of Blindness and Deafness of the World Health Organization. Activities take place across the globe and an event is hosted at the World Health Organization on March 3rd. The ca ...

World Mental Health survey initiative

The World Mental Health Survey Initiative is a collaborative project by World Health Organization, Harvard University, University of Michigan, and country-based researchers worldwide to coordinate the analysis and implementation of epidemiologica ...

Healing of periapical lesions

Apical periodontitis is typically the bodys defense response to the threat of microbial invasion from the root canal. Primary among the members of the host defense mechanism is the polymorphonuclear leukocyte, otherwise known as the neutrophil. T ...

Hemostasis

Hemostasis or haemostasis is a process to prevent and stop bleeding, meaning to keep blood within a damaged blood vessel. It is the first stage of wound healing. This involves coagulation, blood changing from a liquid to a gel. Intact blood vesse ...

Micropore particle technology

Micropore particle technology consists of fine, highly porous particles that remove fluid by a combination of capillary action and evaporation. Currently, they are mainly used in wound healing, where they absorb wound exudate into their micropore ...

Qigong

Qigong, qi gong, chi kung, or chi gung is a centuries-old system of coordinated body-posture and movement, breathing, and meditation used for the purposes of health, spirituality, and martial-arts training. With roots in Chinese medicine, philoso ...

Regeneration (biology)

In biology, regeneration is the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that makes genomes, cells, organisms, and ecosystems resilient to natural fluctuations or events that cause disturbance or damage. Every species is capable of regeneratio ...

Scar

A scar is an area of fibrous tissue that replaces normal skin after an injury. Scars result from the biological process of wound repair in the skin, as well as in other organs and tissues of the body. Thus, scarring is a natural part of the heali ...

Scar free healing

Scar free healing is the process by which significant injuries can heal without permanent damage to the tissue the injury has affected. In most healing, scars form due to the fibrosis and wound contraction, however in scar free healing tissue is ...

Self-healing

Self-healing refers to the process of recovery, motivated by and directed by the patient, guided often only by instinct. Such a process encounters mixed fortunes due to its amateur nature, although self-motivation is a major asset. The value of s ...

Wound assessment

Wound assessment is a component of wound management. As far as may be practical, the assessment is to be accomplished before prescribing any treatment plan. The objective is to collect information about the patient and about the wound, that may b ...

Wound healing

Wound healing is a complex process in which the skin, and the tissues under it, repair themselves after injury. In this article, wound healing is depicted in a discrete timeline of physical attributes constituting the post-trauma repairing proces ...

Wound healing assay

A wound healing assay is a laboratory technique used to study cell migration and cell–cell interaction. This is also called a scratch assay because it is done by making a scratch on a cell monolayer and capturing images at regular intervals by ti ...

Australian paradox

The Australian Paradox is a term coined in 2011 to describe what its proponents say are diverging trends in sugar consumption and obesity rates in Australia. The term was first used in a 2011 study published in Nutrients by Professor Jennie Brand ...

French paradox

The French paradox is a catchphrase first used in the late 1980s, that summarizes the apparently paradoxical epidemiological observation that French people have a relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease, while having a diet relatively ...

Glucose paradox

The glucose paradox was the observation that the large amount of glycogen in the liver was not explained by the small amount of glucose absorbed. The explanation was that the majority of glycogen is made from a number of substances other than glu ...

Hispanic paradox

The Hispanic paradox, or Latino paradox, also known as the "epidemiologic paradox," refers to the epidemiological finding that Hispanic and Latino Americans tend to have health outcomes that "paradoxically" are comparable to, or in some cases bet ...

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