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Spitting

Spitting is the act of forcibly ejecting saliva or other substances from the mouth. The act is often done to get rid of unwanted or foul-tasting substances in the mouth or to get rid of a large buildup of saliva. It is currently considered rude a ...

Thumb sucking

Thumb sucking is a behavior found in humans, chimpanzees, captive ring-tailed lemurs, and other primates. It usually involves placing the thumb into the mouth and rhythmically repeating sucking contact for a prolonged duration. It can also be acc ...

Tic

A tic is a sudden, repetitive, nonrhythmic motor movement or vocalization involving discrete muscle groups. Tics can be invisible to the observer, such as abdominal tensing or toe crunching. Common motor and phonic tics are, respectively, eye bli ...

Tobacco and other drugs

An association between tobacco and other drug use has been well established. The nature of this association remains unclear. The two main theories, which are not mutually exclusive, are the phenotypic causation model and the correlated liabilitie ...

Tobacco smoking

Tobacco smoking is the practice of smoking tobacco and inhaling tobacco smoke. A broader definition may include simply taking tobacco smoke into the mouth, and then releasing it, as is done by some with tobacco pipes and cigars. The practice is b ...

A-not-A question

In linguistics, an A-not-A question, also known as an A-neg-A question, is a polar question that offers two opposite possibilities for the answer. Predominantly researched in Sinitic languages, the A-not-A question offers a choice between an affi ...

Adjacency pairs

In linguistics, an adjacency pair is an example of conversational turn-taking. An adjacency pair is composed of two utterances by two speakers, one after the other. The speaking of the first utterance provokes a responding utterance. Adjacency pa ...

Ambiguity tolerance–intolerance

Ambiguity tolerance–intolerance is a psychological construct that describes the relationship that individuals have with ambiguous stimuli or events. Individuals view these stimuli in a neutral and open way or as a threat.

Anade

Ana is a Burmese cultural and social value that has no English equivalent and is manifested by very strong inhibitions against asserting oneself in human relations based on the fear that it will offend someone or cause someone to lose face, or be ...

Apology (act)

An apology is an expression of regret or remorse for actions, while apologizing is the act of expressing regret or remorse. In informal situations, it may be called saying sorry. The goal of apologizing is generally forgiveness, reconciliation an ...

Applause

Applause is primarily a form of ovation by the act of clapping, or striking the palms of the hands together, in order to create noise. Audiences usually applaud after a performance, such as a musical concert, speech, or play, as a sign of enjoyme ...

Articulatory gestures

Articulatory gestures are the actions necessary to enunciate language. Examples of articulatory gestures are the hand movements necessary to enunciate sign language and the mouth movements of speech. In semiotic terms, they are the physical embod ...

Basic interpersonal communicative skills

Basic interpersonal communicative skills are language skills needed to interact in social situations, for example, when speaking to a friend on the telephone. BICS refers primarily to context-bound, face-to-face communication, like the language f ...

BLUF (communication)

A BLUF is a paragraph where the conclusions and recommendations are placed at the beginning of the text, rather than the end, in order to facilitate rapid decision making. This differs from an older, more-traditional style in which conclusions an ...

Body-to-body communication

Body-to-body communication is a way of communicating with others through the use of nonverbal communication, or without using speech or verbalization. It can include body language, facial expressions, and other bodily gestures in order to communi ...

Booing

Booing is an act of showing displeasure for someone or something, generally in response to an entertainer, by loudly yelling boo! and sustaining the "oo" sound by holding it out. People may also make hand signs at the entertainer, such as the thu ...

Brouhaha

A brouhaha, from French brouhaha, is a state of social agitation when a minor incident gets out of control, sometimes referred to as an uproar or hubbub.

Care perspective

In psychology, the care perspective focuses on people in terms of their connectedness with others, interpersonal communication, relationships with others, and concern for others.

Clapping

A clap is the percussive sound made by striking together two flat surfaces, as in the body parts of humans or animals. Humans clap with the palms of their hands, often quickly and repeatedly to express appreciation or approval, but also in rhythm ...

Cluttering

Cluttering is a speech and communication disorder characterized by a rapid rate of speech, erratic rhythm, and poor syntax or grammar, making speech difficult to understand.

Cognitive complexity

Cognitive complexity describes cognition along a simplicity-complexity axis. It is the subject of academic study in fields including personal construct psychology, organisational theory and human–computer interaction.

Collapsing sequence

A collapsing sequence occurs in human speech when utterance pairs between speakers have some unspoken thought occurring between them that may make the latter phrase, out of context, seem to have no logical connection to the former; there is, howe ...

Communibiology

Communibiology is a term referring to a research paradigm that emphasizes the "neurobiological foundations of human communication behavior". Communibiologists take the nature side of the nature versus nurture debate in communication development. ...

Human–computer interaction

Human–computer interaction studies the design and use of computer technology, focused on the interfaces between people and computers. Researchers in the field of HCI observe the ways in which humans interact with computers and design technologies ...

Concreteness

Concreteness is an aspect of communication that means being specific, definite, and vivid rather than vague and general. A concrete communication uses specific facts and figures. Concreteness is often taught in college communication courses as on ...

Council circle

A council circle is a distinctive feature at the center of some tribal communities in North America. The historical function of the council circles is debated. Some suggest that the talking circles are ceremonial, and others support a hypothesis ...

Cued speech

Cued speech is a visual system of communication used with and among deaf or hard-of-hearing people. It is a phonemic-based system which makes traditionally spoken languages accessible by using a small number of handshapes, known as cues, in diffe ...

Cursor (user interface)

In computer user interfaces, a cursor is an indicator used to show the current position for user interaction on a computer monitor or other display device that will respond to input from a text input or pointing device. The mouse cursor is also c ...

Diversity Icebreaker

Diversity Icebreaker is a questionnaire used in seminars where the aim is to improve communication and interaction in the group or between different departments or subsidiaries in a bigger company or organization. Based on the results from the qu ...

Double-swing model

The double-swing model is a model of intercultural communication, originated by Muneo Yoshikawa, conceptualizing how individuals, cultures, and intercultural notions can meet in constructive ways. The communication is understood as an infinite pr ...

Echo answer

In linguistics, an echo answer or echo response is a way of answering a polar question without using words for yes and no. The verb used in the question is simply echoed in the answer, negated if the answer has a negative truth-value. For example ...

Echo subject

An echo subject is a verb that has the same subject as the preceding verb. In some languages, such as Erromangan, it is commonly marked with a special reduced set of prefixes which replace the full set of subject prefixes.

Emotional competence

Emotional competence refers to the essential social skills to recognize, interpret, and respond constructively to emotions in yourself and others. The term implies an ease around others and determines ones ability to effectively and successfully ...

Error

An error is an action which is inaccurate or incorrect. In some usages, an error is synonymous with a mistake. In statistics, "error" refers to the difference between the value which has been computed and the correct value. An error could result ...

Ethical persuasion

Ethical persuasion is a human beings internal ability to treat others with respect, understanding, caring, and fairness in order to understand themselves and phases of ethical persuasion; they are: Create resolutions. Explore the other persons vi ...

Face (sociological concept)

Face is a class of behaviors and customs operating in different countries and cultures, associated with the morality, honor, and authority of an individual, and its image in social groups.

Face-to-face interaction

Face-to-face interaction is a concept in sociology, linguistics, media and communication studies describing social interaction carried out without any mediating technology. Face-to-face interaction is defined as the mutual influence of individual ...

Filler (linguistics)

In linguistics, a filler, filled pause, hesitation marker or planner is a sound or word that is spoken in conversation by one participant to signal to others a pause to think without giving the impression of having finished speaking. Fillers fall ...

Functional Attitude Theory

Functional attitude theory suggests that beliefs and attitudes are influential to various psychological functions. Attitudes can be influential on many processes such as being utilitarian, social, relating to values, or a reduction of cognitive d ...

Fundamental interpersonal relations orientation

Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation is a theory of interpersonal relations, introduced by William Schutz in 1958. This theory mainly explains the interpersonal interactions of a local group of people. The theory is based on the belief ...

Gatekeeping (communication)

Gatekeeping is the process through which information is filtered for dissemination, whether for publication, broadcasting, the Internet, or some other mode of communication. The academic theory of gatekeeping is founded in multiple fields of stud ...

Gaze

In critical theory, sociology, and psychoanalysis, the gaze is the act of seeing and, in the philosophical and figurative sense, how an individual perceives other individuals, other groups, or oneself. The concept and the social applications of t ...

General semantics

General semantics is a self-improvement and therapy program begun in the 1920s that seeks to regulate human mental habits and behaviors. After partial launches under the names human engineering and humanology, Polish-American originator Alfred Ko ...

Gibb Categories

The Gibb categories are elements of a strategy for interpersonal communication. Separated into defensive and supportive techniques, the categories provide a framework for effective communication. The categories are outlined by Jack Gibb. Gibb cat ...

Global Language Monitor

The Global Language Monitor is an Austin, Texas-based company that collectively documents, analyzes, and tracks trends in language usage worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. It is particularly known for its Word of the ...

Gossip

Gossip is a mass medium or rumor, especially about the personal or private affairs of others; the act is also known as dishing or tattling. Gossip has been researched in terms of its origins in evolutionary psychology, which has found gossip to b ...

Grounding in communication

Grounding in communication is a concept proposed by Herbert H. Clark and Susan E. Brennan. It comprises the collection of "mutual knowledge, mutual beliefs, and mutual assumptions" that is essential for communication between two people. Successfu ...

Group development

The goal of most research on group development is to learn why and how small groups change over time. To do this, researchers examine patterns of change and continuity in groups over time. Aspects of a group that might be studied include the qual ...

Head bobble

The head bobble, or Indian head shake refers to a common gesture found in South Asian cultures, most notably in India. The motion usually consists of a side-to-side tilting of the head in arcs along the coronal plane. A form of nonverbal communic ...

Heckler

A heckler is a person who harasses and tries to disconcert others with questions, challenges, or gibes. Hecklers are often known to shout disparaging comments at a performance or event, or to interrupt set-piece speeches, with the intent of distu ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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