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Deep history

Deep history is a term for the distant past of the human species. As an intellectual discipline, deep history encourages scholars in anthropology, archaeology, primatology, genetics and linguistics to work together to write a common narrative abo ...

Deep social mind

Deep social mind is a concept in evolutionary psychology; it refers to the distinctively human capacity to read the mental states of others while reciprocally enabling those others to read ones own mental states at the same time. The term deep so ...

Derbfine

The derbfine was a term for patrilineal groups and power structures defined in the first written tracts in Early Irish law. Its principal purpose was as an institution of property inheritance, with property redistributed on the death of a member ...

Deterritorialization

In anthropology, deterritorialization is the separation of social, cultural and political practices from a location.

Development anthropology

Development anthropology refers to the application of anthropological perspectives to the multidisciplinary branch of development studies. It takes international development and international aid as primary objects. In this branch of anthropology ...

Diary studies

Diary studies is a research method that collects qualitative information by having participants record entries about their everyday lives in a log, diary or journal about the activity or experience being studied. This collection of data uses a lo ...

Diaspora studies

Diaspora studies is an academic field established in the late 20th century to study dispersed ethnic populations, which are often termed diaspora peoples. The usage of the term diaspora carries the connotation of forced resettlement, due to expul ...

Digging stick

In archaeology and anthropology, a digging stick, or sometimes yam stick, is a wooden implement used primarily by subsistence-based cultures to dig out underground food such as roots and tubers or burrowing animals and anthills. The stick may als ...

Digital artifact

Digital artifact in information science, is any undesired or unintended alteration in data introduced in a digital process by an involved technique and/or technology. In anthropology and archeology a digital artifact is an artifact that is of a d ...

Direct historical approach

The direct historical approach to archaeology was a methodology developed in the United States of America during the 1920s-1930s by William Duncan Strong and others, which argued that knowledge relating to historical periods is extended back into ...

Discourse

Discourse denotes written and spoken communications: The totality of codified language vocabulary used in a given field of intellectual enquiry and of social practice, such as legal discourse, medical discourse, religious discourse, et cetera. In ...

Doxa

Doxa is a Greek word meaning common belief or popular opinion. In classical rhetoric, doxa is contrasted with episteme. The word doxa picked up a new meaning between the 3rd and 1st centuries BC when the Septuagint translated the biblical Hebrew ...

Ecological anthropology

Ecological anthropology is a sub-field of anthropology and is defined as the "study of cultural adaptations to environments". The sub-field is also defined as, "the study of relationships between a population of humans and their biophysical envir ...

Political economy in anthropology

Political Economy in anthropology is the application of the theories and methods of historical materialism to the traditional concerns of anthropology, including, but not limited to, non-capitalist societies. Political Economy introduced question ...

Emic and etic

In anthropology, folkloristics, and the social and behavioral sciences, emic and etic refer to two kinds of field research done and viewpoints obtained: emic, from within the social group and etic, from outside.

Epochalism

Epochalism is an attitude of respect for the progressive spirit of the age and for social and technological advancement, which was contrasted by Clifford Geertz with what he termed the valorisation of traditional values. He viewed this distinctio ...

Ethnobiology

Ethnobiology is the scientific study of the way living things are treated or used by different human cultures. It studies the dynamic relationships between people, biota, and environments, from the distant past to the immediate present. "People-b ...

Ethnocynology

Ethnocynology is a neologism coined by anthropologist Bryan Cummins in his book First Nations, First Dogs: Canadian Aboriginal Ethnocynology. It refers to the study of dogs within their cultural contexts. Cummins states that the domestic dog, des ...

Ethnographic realism

Within the field of anthropology and other social sciences, ethnography is a form of research that relies on a range of sources of data, but usually tends to rely mainly on participant observation. However, the term also refers to the product of ...

Ethnohistory

Ethnohistory is the study of cultures and indigenous peoples customs by examining historical records as well as other sources of information on their lives and history. It is also the study of the history of various ethnic groups that may or may ...

Ethnolinguistics

Ethnolinguistics is a field of linguistics that studies the relationship between language and culture and how different ethnic groups perceive the world. It is the combination between ethnology and linguistics. The former refers to the way of lif ...

Ethnomuseology

Ethnomuseology is the study of museums and museum curation in the context of the culture and cultural traditions of its collections. It is an interdisciplinary field combining museum studies, anthropology, ethnography, and often various fine arts.

Ethnoornithology

Ethnoornithology is the study of the relationship between people and birds. It is a branch of ethnozoology and so of the wider field of ethnobiology. Ethnoornithology is an interdisciplinary subject and combines anthropological, cognitive and lin ...

Ethnoscape

Ethnoscape is one of five elementary frameworks used by Arjun Appadurai, in purpose of exploring fundamental discrepancies of global cultural flows. The suffix -scape indicates that these terms are perspectival constructs inflected by the histori ...

Evolutionary anthropology

Evolutionary anthropology is the interdisciplinary study of the evolution of human physiology and human behaviour and the relation between hominids and non-hominid primates. Evolutionary anthropology is based in natural science and social science ...

Exocannibalism

Exocannibalism, as opposed to endocannibalism, is the consumption of flesh outside ones close social group - for example, eating ones enemy. When done ritually, it has been associated with being a means of imbibing valued qualities of the victim ...

Experimental language

An experimental language is a constructed language designed for linguistics research, often on the relationship between language and thought. One particular assumption having received much attention in fiction is popularly known as the Sapir–Whor ...

Extension transference

Extension transference is the symbolic sub-division of a particular goal or purpose so that the sub-divided concepts seem fragmented from the original purpose. "…when applied to language and experience, becomes a useful theoretical concept. Thus, ...

Feminist anthropology

Feminist anthropology is a four-field approach to anthropology that seeks to transform research findings, anthropological hiring practices, and the scholarly production of knowledge, using insights from feminist theory. Simultaneously, feminist a ...

Fiction-absolute

The concept of fiction-absolute exists firstly within the context of anthropology, secondly within the study of group psychology and tribalism. The term was coined and defined by journalist Tom Wolfe in his 2006 Jefferson Lecture for the National ...

Financescape

Financescape is one the five aspects of global cultural flows that renowned globalization theorist Arjun Appadurai proposed in his article Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy that he claims can be used to distinguish the var ...

First contact (anthropology)

In anthropology, first contact is the first meeting of two cultures previously unaware of one another. Notable examples of first contact are those between the Spanish Empire and the Arawak in 1492; and the Aboriginal Australians with Europeans in ...

Foramen cecum (dental)

The Foramen cecum, in dental anthropology, is a minor expression of the protosylid of the tooth. It is thus indirectly related to the five non-metric dental crown traits. According to dental, biological studies, racially mixed populations have be ...

FORDISC

Before ForDisc, many anthropologists based their studies off of museum skeletal collections such as the Hamann-Todd collection that is housed at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio, and the Terry collection housed at the Smithsonian Instituti ...

Fosterage

Fosterage, the practice of a family bringing up a child not their own, differs from adoption in that the childs parents, not the foster-parents, remain the acknowledged parents. In many modern western societies foster care can be organised by the ...

Four-field approach

The four-field approach in anthropology sees the discipline as composed of the four subfields of Archaeology, Linguistics, Physical Anthropology and Cultural anthropology. The approach is conventionally understood as having been developed by Fran ...

Frazer Lecture

The Sir James George Frazer Memorial Lectureship in Social Anthropology is a British academic lecture series. In 1920 a sum of £675 was raised by a Committee of the University of Cambridge for the purpose of commemorating Sir James Frazer’s contr ...

Friction of distance

The concept of friction of distance is based on the notion that distance usually requires some amount of effort, energy, time, and/or other resources to overcome. Because of this "friction", spatial interactions, especially transport and the part ...

Generative anthropology

Generative anthropology is a field of study based on the theory that the origin of human language was a singular event and that the history of human culture is a genetic or "generative" development stemming from the development of language. In co ...

Geometric morphometrics in anthropology

The study of geometric morphometrics in anthropology has made a major impact on the field of morphometrics by aiding in some of the technological and methodological advancements. Geometric morphometrics is an approach that studies shape using Car ...

Gebelein predynastic mummies

The Gebelein predynastic mummies are six naturally mummified bodies, dating to approximately 3400 BC from the Late Predynastic period of Ancient Egypt. They were the first complete predynastic bodies to be discovered. The well-preserved bodies we ...

Gorgoneion

In Ancient Greece, the Gorgoneion was a special apotropaic amulet showing the Gorgon head, used most famously by the Olympian deities Athena and Zeus: both are said to have worn the gorgoneion as a protective pendant, and often are depicted weari ...

Grave goods

Grave goods, in archaeology and anthropology, are the items buried along with the body. They are usually personal possessions, supplies to smooth the deceaseds journey into the afterlife or offerings to the gods. Grave goods may be classed as a t ...

Guanche mummies

Guanche mummies are the intentionally desiccated remains of members of the indigenous Berber Guanche people of the Canary Islands. The Guanche mummies were made during the eras prior to Spanish settlement of the area in the 15th century. The meth ...

Hau (sociology)

Hau is a notion made popular by the French anthropologist Marcel Mauss in his 1925 book The Gift. Surveying the practice of gifting, he came to the conclusion that it involved belief in a force binding the receiver and giver. The term Hau, used b ...

Headhunting

Headhunting is the practice of taking and preserving a persons head after killing the person. Headhunting was practised in historic times in parts of Oceania, South Asia and Southeast Asia, West and Central Africa, Mesoamerica, and Europe. It occ ...

Human height

Human height or stature is the distance from the bottom of the feet to the top of the head in a human body, standing erect. It is measured using a stadiometer, usually in centimetres when using the metric system, or feet and inches when using the ...

Hill people

Hill people, also referred to as mountain people, is a general term for people who live in the hills and mountains. This includes all rugged land above 300 metres and all land above 2.500 metres elevation. The climate is generally harsh, with ste ...

Historical anthropology

Historical anthropology is a historiographical movement which applies methodologies and objectives from Social and Cultural Anthropology to the study of historical societies. Like most such movements, it is understood in different ways by differe ...

Historical behaviour studies

Historical behaviour studies is a field of research in cultural history and cultural anthropology and a particular methodological approach to the study of human behaviour.

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