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First possession theory of property

The "first possession" theory of property holds that ownership of something is justified simply by someone seizing it before someone else does. This contrasts with the labor theory of property where something may become property only by applying ...

Foreclosure consultant

Although the definition may vary by jurisdiction, foreclosure consultant generally means any person who makes any solicitation, representation, or offer to any owner to perform for compensation or who, for compensation, performs any service which ...

Formal contract

A formal contract is a contract where the parties have signed under seal, while an informal contract is one not under seal. A seal can be any impression made upon the document by the parties to the contract. This was traditionally done in wax sta ...

Four corners (law)

The Four Corners Rule is a legal doctrine that courts use to determine the meaning of a written instrument such as a contract, will, or deed as represented solely by its textual content. The doctrine states that where there is an ambiguity of ter ...

Frank-marriage

Frank-marriage, in real property law, a species of estate tail, now obsolete. When a man was seized of land in fee simple, and gave it to a daughter on marriage, the daughter and her husband were termed the donees in frank-marriage, because they ...

Free and clear

In property law, the term free and clear refers to ownership without legal encumbrances, such as a lien or mortgage. So, for example: a person owns a house free and clear if he has paid off the mortgage and no creditor has filed a lien against it ...

Freedom of testation

Freedom of testation is the power of a person to make a will and testament specifying whatever heirs they please. It is historically associated with English common law, and contrasted with forced heirship, where part or all of the estate is autom ...

Fused profession

Fused profession is a term relating to jurisdictions where the legal profession is not divided between barristers and solicitors. Generally, the term is used in the context of Commonwealth countries, where the single profession of "barrister and ...

Galicia v. Trump

Galicia v. Trump is a case put before the New York Supreme Court in which plaintiffs alleged that they were assaulted in 2015 by Donald Trumps security team at Trump Tower while peacefully protesting Trumps statements related to Black Lives Matte ...

General incorporation law

A general incorporation law allows corporations to be formed without a charter from the legislature. It also refers to a law enabling a certain type of corporation, such as a railroad, to exercise eminent domain and other special rights without a ...

Geographic targeting order

A Geographic targeting order is an order issued by the United States Secretary of Treasury requiring any United States domestic financial institutions that exist within a geographic area to report on transactions any greater than a specified valu ...

Georgia First Offender Act

The Georgia First Offender Act is a legal resource for certain first time criminal offenders to not plead guilty, and have their records expunged if they comply with the laws provisions. Upon successful compliance with this law, the defendants cr ...

GNAT Modified General Public License

The GNAT Modified General Public License is a version of the GNU General Public License specifically modified for compiled units and for the generic feature found in the Ada programming language. The modification is as follows: As a special excep ...

Grand rights

Grand rights is a type of music licensing, specifically covering the right to perform musical compositions within the context of a dramatic work. This includes stage performances such as musical theater, concert dance, and arrangements of music f ...

Grave disability

Grave disability or gravely disabled is a legal status used as a criteria in addition to danger to self or others as the basis for involuntary commitment in only 9 of 50 states of the United States. It is not a criterion in Washington, D.C. In Ca ...

Green v Hatchy Investments pty Ltd

Green v Hatchy Investments pty Ltd was an important appeals case in Queensland, Australia, which set a precedent for Queensland landlord-tenant law, and clarified the rule around the requirement of conciliation before a plaintiff could begin lega ...

Grievance

A grievance is a wrong or hardship suffered, real or supposed, which forms legitimate grounds of complaint. In the past, the word meant the infliction or cause of hardship.

Joseph Grimberg

Joseph Grimberg was a Singaporean prominent lawyer and former Supreme Court judge. Grimberg joined Drew & Napier when he was called to the Singapore Bar in 1957. He was a senior partner at the law firm from 1967 to 1987, when he was appointed Jud ...

Guest statute

A guest statute is a term used in the law of torts to describe a statute that makes it significantly more difficult for a passenger in an automobile to recover damages from the driver for injuries received in an accident resulting from ordinary n ...

Harm

Harm is a moral and legal concept. Bernard Gert construes harm as any of the following: death loss of ability or freedom pain loss of pleasure. disability Joel Feinberg gives an account of harm as setbacks to interests. He distinguishes welfare i ...

Hartford College of Law

The Hartford College of Law was a law school operating in Hartford, Connecticut from October 25, 1921 to October 27, 1948, when it was fully merged into the University of Connecticut, which had taken over administrative control of the school by l ...

Harvard Negotiation Project

The Harvard Negotiation Project is a project created at Harvard University which deals with issues of negotiations and conflict resolution. The stated aims and goal of the project, according to the Harvard Law School site is as follows: The missi ...

Headnote

A headnote is a brief summary of a particular point of law that is added to the text of a court decision to aid readers in locating discussion of a legal issue in an opinion. As the term implies, headnotes appear at the beginning of the published ...

Hebraic law

The term Hebraic law refers to a set of ancient Hebrew Law as found in the Torah of the Hebrew Bible also known as Mosaic Law. However, the Talmud rather than the Hebraic law is considered the beginning of the Jewish law. The Hebraic law has a gr ...

Helium Privatization Act of 1996

The Helium Privatization Act of 1996 is a United States statute that ordered the US government to sell much of the National Helium Reserve. The United States 104th Congressional session passed the Act of Congress presenting the legislation to the ...

Hext v Yeomans

Hext v Yeomans is an early defamation case wherein the Court found that slander do not lie upon inferences. It was the origin of the mitior sensus doctrine, imputing a mere intention to commit a crime was held to be nonactionable. The defendant r ...

High Court of Botswana

The High Court of Botswana is based in Lobatse in Botswana. It operates above the Magistrates Courts of Botswana, but below the Appeal Court. The High Court is headed by the Chief Justice of Botswana.

Highway authority

The National Highways Authority of India is the national authority for the management of a network of over 60.000 km of national highways in India. The Authority is a part of the Ministry of Shipping, Road Transport and Highways.

His Honour

His Honour or Her Honour is an honorific prefix traditionally applied to certain classes of people, in particular justices and judges and mayors. In Australia and the United States, the prefix is also used for magistrates. A corruption of the ter ...

Historic-artistic

In Spain, the historic-artistic is a legal statement that gives assets declared as historical-artistic monuments in a given locality the protection of Spanish cultural goods, which is regulated by the Ministry of Culture of Spain.

Horizontal effect

In law, horizontal effect refers to the ability of legal requirements meant to apply only to public bodies to affect private rights. It arises where a court dealing with a legal dispute between purely private entities interprets a legal provision ...

Housing of the Working Classes Act 1890

Housing of the Working Classes Act 1885, was a public health act not a housing act. It empowered local authorities to condemn slum housing, but could not purchase the land and finance new housing. This act did that.

Housing of the Working Classes Act 1900

The Housing of the Working Classes Act 1885 was a public health act, not a housing act. It empowered local authorities to condemn slum housing, but not to purchase the land or finance new housing. The Housing of the Working Classes Act 1890 gave ...

ID–WithoutColors

ID–WITHOUTCOLORS is a 2013 German documentary film by Riccardo Valsecchi produced by the Migrationsrat Berlin-Brandenburg. The film follows the 2012 sentence of the administrative court of Koblenz, Western Germany, which on February 27, dismissed ...

Identity change

Identity change describes the intentional changes to an identity document or digital identity. The topic is of particular interest in "faceless" financial transactions and computer security. There are several different parties who may initiate th ...

Identity creation

Identity creation is the process of creating a new personal identity or alias for an existing person. It is commonly employed: To protect people having risk of being murdered for other reasons, such as honor killing. By fugitives. In order to com ...

Imminent peril

Imminent peril, or imminent danger, is an American legal concept where Imminent peril is "certain danger, immediate, and impending; menacingly close at hand, and threatening." In many states in the USA, a mere necessity for quick action does not ...

Immutable characteristic

An immutable characteristic is any sort of physical attribute which is perceived as being unchangeable, entrenched and innate. The term is often used to describe segments of the population which share such attributes and are contrasted from other ...

Implied repeal

The doctrine of implied repeal is a concept in constitutional theory which states that where an Act of Parliament or an Act of Congress conflicts with an earlier one, the later Act takes precedence and the conflicting parts of the earlier Act bec ...

Impunity Watch

Impunity Watch is an online publication dedicated to informing the world about the numerous state violations of citizens rights. Impunity Watch is an interactive website that operates as a law review, message board, and blog; it was created with ...

Income segregation

Income segregation is the separation of various peoples by class based on income. For example, certain people cannot get into country clubs because of insufficient funds. Many residential areas are segregated as a practical matter by income due t ...

Independent Adjudicator

An independent adjudicator is an authorized judge, who has the power to make binding decisions in a particular field. The mechanism is designed to represent the interests of groups which would otherwise have gone unrepresented, such as students w ...

Individual rights advocate

An Individual rights advocate is an advocate "to protect the legal and human rights of individuals with disabilities." United States law provides for advocates to protect the legal rights of persons with disabilities. This advocacy can be life-ch ...

Ingress, egress, and regress

In property law, ingress, egress, and regress are the rights of a person to enter, leave, and return to a property, respectively. In a sale and purchase contract, it means that the buyer gets full rights to insure the property according to Standa ...

Inhlawulo

Inhlawulo, in Swazi/Zulu law, is a fine or damages paid In Zulu culture, inhlawulo refers to damages paid to the family of a woman who became pregnant out of wedlock by the father of the future child.

Insanity Defense Reform Act

The Insanity Defense Reform Act of 1984 was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan on October 12, 1984, amending the United States federal laws governing defendants with mental diseases or defects to make it significantly more difficult to ob ...

Institute for Legal Research

The Institute for Legal Research is a legal research center at the UC Berkeley School of Law. It was founded in 1967 as the Earl Warren Legal Institute, after American jurist and politician Earl Warren, and was originally an Organized Research Un ...

Intellectual property infringement

An intellectual property infringement is the infringement or violation of an intellectual property right. There are several types of intellectual property rights, such as copyrights, patents, trademarks, and industrial designs. Therefore, an inte ...

Interested Parties Information

IPI is a unique identifying number assigned by the CISAC database to each Interested Party in collective rights management. It is used worldwide by more than 120 countries and three million right holders. Two type of IPI-numbers exist:

Intergovernmental immunity (United States)

In United States Constitutional Law, intergovernmental immunity is a doctrine that prevents the federal government and individual state governments from intruding on each others sovereignty. It is also referred to as a Supremacy Clause immunity o ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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